Rss

Archives for : picture book

The Snowman’s Revenge

Snow days are always more fun with a freshly built snowman. However, when the children in The Snowman’s Revenge head in to warm up and enjoy some hot cocoa, the snowman is left all alone outside in the cold. Hurt and lonely, he quickly comes up with a plan for revenge.

Mark Smuthe’s prose is entertaining, if a little choppy, enhanced by Mike Motz’s full color illustrations. Personally, I found the idea of the book to be creepy. My children, on the other hand, thought it was a fun read. It’s definitely a change from the happy singing snowmen, and for that alone, it’s a nice change (although still a creepy one).

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

Is a Worry Worrying You?

Everyone worries from time to time, and dealing with those worries often seems monumental, especially for children. Ferida Wolff and Herriet May Sevitz have addressed just this issue in their book, Is a Worry Worrying You? With beautiful full color illustrations by Marie LeTourneau, the book manages to discuss worries and introduce brainstorming possible solutions of how to deal with them in a light hearted manner, opening up further discussions. It’s a fantastic picture book and one that we have checked out from the library several times over the years due to the story alone.

Disclaimer: A complimentary copy was provided by the publisher.

Previously published at Living Peacefully with Children.

Sometimes I Like to Curl Up in a Ball

Today is my youngest niece’s first birthday. As part of her birthday gift, I was looking for the board book version of Vicki Churchill and Charles Fuge’s book, Sometimes I Like to Curl Up in a Ball. This has been a favorite book at our house through the years. I think we are on our second or third copy. I love giving this as part of a first birthday gift. It’s perfect for toddlers. We have given many, many of these as gifts, to friends and family who practice attachment parenting and those who are very mainstream. Everyone has loved it.

Sometimes I Like to Curl Up in a Ball

The rhythmic prose of the book flows well. Children love to imitate what the little wombat does throughout the book, so it works for those toddlers who are active all the time and don’t want to sit down to read a book. I like the fact that the little wombat does things to explore and has big feelings. It appeals to every child. At the end of the book, the little wombat does what he loves best – he curls up in a ball and snuggles close to his mom to sleep. What a better way to end a day then with your little one snuggled up close?

Previously posted at Living Peacefully with Children