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Archives for : Paranormal

Hereafter

Tara Hudson’s new novel, Hereafter, promised to deliver an enticingly unique young adult book, different from the rest of the watered down love stories on the market. Unfortunately, it didn’t deliver.

Amelia, a ghost who doesn’t remember anything except her first name and parts of her death, wanders around aimlessly, as do the first 50 pages of the book. I forced myself to continue reading, waiting for the book to pick up and deliver the fascinating read that would have me on tender hooks. After finishing the 400+ page book, I’m still waiting. The story seemed contrived and lacking, although the book cover is hauntingly appealing.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by HarperTeen.

Previously published at Living Peacefully with Children.

Lost Voices

Sarah Porter’s new book,  Lost Voices, seems depressingly lost. Addressing the abuses of young girls at the hands of the people who should love them and take care of them, the book missed a great opportunity for empowering the young readers who may look to it. While the writing is beautifully descriptive, it rambles along on tangents which serve to detract from the story, which is lacking to begin with. The characters are shallow and add to the depression of the book, which ends abruptly without bringing any closure.

I would love to see someone pick up the theme and write a fantastic fictional book for young girls.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by Harcourt Books.

Previously posted at Living Peacefully with Children.

Hunting Human

Beth Williams is haunted by memories and running from a past that she neither understands nor which she can classify as rational or sane. Once a promising young architect with a position to begin graduate work, a celebratory trip to Europe and the resulting death of her best friend and foster sister, Beth now moves about from place to place. Finally, having found a place as a barista and staying in the same city for longer than usual, a charming man walks into her solitary life and her carefully and tentatively held world begins to implode.

Amanda Alvarez’s debut novel, Hunting Human, is a well written werewolf novel. Her shifting is descriptive and more realistic than many books in this genre. However, the romance side of the book seems forced and a bit out of sync. Overall, it was a quick, fun read and would appeal to most readers of paranormal romance.

Disclaimer: A complimentary copy of the book was provided by Carina Press.

Previously posted at Living Peacefully with Children.

The Sleepwalkers

Caleb’s life is all set. He has his plans laid out for after high school graduation until the arrival of a letter from an old childhood friend. Shortly after, he sets out on a road trip with his best friend, Bean, to find out what is going on. Arriving at his old hometown, he finds that secrets have been kept there for years.

J. Gabriel Gates’ The Sleepwalkers brings a new scene for teen horror. Reminiscent of Stephen King and John Saul, the story is artfully written and skillfully suspenseful. While I found I had many questions about some of the story’s end, it merely added to the disquieting feeling of the book.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

Previously posted at Living Peacefully with Children.

The Shadowing

Callum Scott is predominantly a normal boy. He does well enough in school, plays rugby, and keeps a low profile. The only problem is that for as long as he can remember he has seen ghosts. Now his premonitions are growing and he is being chased by a large creature from another place. Life is about to get interesting.

Adam Slater’s The Shadowing: Hunted would be a mediocre paranormal young adult novel with characters who are screaming to be further developed. However, he has managed to weave new aspects into his brand new paranormal series which may just set the foundation for a great story.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

Previously posted at Living Peacefully with Children.

Bane: Book Two of The Coven Series

Having previously fled from her over-controlling father and the other witches of the dark coven, Jax Pherson is on the run again. Leaving those she cares about behind in an attempt to protect them, she and another rebelling witch, Egan, are on the search for a way to stop their families and covens. Gaining allies along they way, Jax and Egan realize that they can’t beat the evil alone.

Bane is the second book in Trish Milburn’s The Coven Series. While there were definitely aspects of the book that kept the story line of the series going with necessary scenes, the overall quality of the second book wasn’t to par with the first, White Witch. The plot meandered about and character development seemed stalled at the beginning before picking up towards the latter half of the novel. The book is short and still enjoyable to read but leaves readers hoping Milburn comes back stronger in the next installment.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

Beyond the Grave

It’s hard to have a normal life when your parents are paranormal investigators. Charlotte’s mother is in a coma after a previous encounter with The Watcher. Her father and sister are struggling to live, the business if falling apart, and Charlotte is left floundering, trying to hold it together and spend time with her boyfriend who is becoming more secretive each day.

Mara Purnhagen’s Beyond the Grave is the third and final book in her Past Midnight series. The book is strong enough to stand alone for those of us who haven’t read her earlier novels, but the characters seem a bit flat and the build up and discovery drags. Luckily, the action at the end mostly makes up for the slow clues.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

This was previously posted at Living Peacefully with Children.

Tankborn

After fleeing a dying Earth, humans were divided into two classes: trueborns, who had money to buy passage on the ship to the new world, and lowborns, who had to work for their passage. In order to elevate the classes and create a working force, tankborns were created. Tankborns, genetically engineered non-humans (GENs), are created with specific skill sets (skets) to serve those who deem them inferior, virtual slaves with no rights. But what makes a human?

Karen Sandler’s Tankborn addresses topics of racism, classism, friendship, humanity, and more in this non-traditional dystopian novel for middle grade/young adults. Tankborn is science fiction for the next generation.

Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher.